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Review: On Sheryl Sandberg’s ‘Lean In’

Sheryl Sandberg wrote us a “sort of feminist manifesto” and I was like — You know what, Sandberg? I’ll take it. Because even before it came out, people were bashing you. The problem is, Sandberg is apparently too rich to give advice. Her “Lean In Campaign” held little for most women, according to the Washington Post. I was immediately reminded of my undergrad studies when I was taking project management. We were supposed to read a self-help business-type book like “The Seven Habits of Highly Successful People,” and the book I had turned up with, Mireille Guiliano’s “French Women Don’t Get Fired“, was written by a woman for women. I was concerned that this book didn’t work because it ignored men completely. I spoke to my instructor who shrugged...
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The Men’s Rights Movement, CAFE & the University of Toronto

This article was originally published at rabble.ca and was reposted with permission from the author. The Canadian Association for Equality (CAFE) and one of its spawns in the campus based Men’s Issues Awareness Group movement have arrived at the University of Toronto with  a bang; and a seeming campaign of overt intimidation against those who oppose them. CAFE, as I have previously written about at some length, is the front group that presents the public and ostensibly less extreme face of the Men’s Rights Movement (also known as the Men’s Rights Advocacy or MRA) in Canada. As I noted in the article they have made on-campus recruitment a major thrust of their overall strategy. In furtherance of this aim, they have set up a number of campus clubs including...
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The Latest in Bedford v Canada: What does it mean?

This is a guest post by Laura Johnston, re-printed with permission of the author and originally published at The F Word. Laura is a law student who worked for Janine Benedet, counsel for the Women’s Coalition for the Abolition of Prostitution, an intervener in Bedford v Canada.   The Ontario Court of Appeal released its judgment in Bedford v Canada on March 26, 2012. Much of the media coverage has presented this as a startling new shift in Canadian law that “swept aside” prostitution laws. However, the judgment was actually an appeal of a trial decision of the Ontario Superior Court made in 2010 and much of Canada’s prostitution laws have remained intact. There are many things to address in this lengthy judgment, but in this post I just want...
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Transcript: Meghan Murphy interviews Shira Tarrant

This interview was transcribed by Ernesto Aguilar and was originally published at his site: People of Color Organize! This post was reprinted with permission. This is a flash transcript of an interview by Meghan Murphy with Shira Tarrant, conducted Feb. 27, 2012. This transcript reflects the broadcast version of the interview aired on Vancouver Co-op Radio. The podcasted version of the full show can be found at rabble.ca Referenced in: Men, Feminism, Race, Movements and the Cult of Hugo Schwyzer: An Interview with Ernesto Aguilar   INTERVIEW:  Meghan Murphy: Do you think a man can be a feminist? Shira Tarrant: I think we can all agree that discrimination and sexual assault, stereotyping are things we all want to fix. And the fact is that men have always been part...
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Men, Feminism, Race, Movements and the Cult of Hugo Schwyzer: An Interview with Ernesto Aguilar

Hugo Schwyzer, a Pasadena City College (Calif.) instructor promoted in some circles for his work related to gender, has been at the center of an online controversy since December when he disclosed an attempt to kill an ex-girlfriend. The Atlantic recently covered the story, for those not familiar with Schwyzer or the incident in question. The story, the defense and the reactions since have created many debates about men in feminism, forgiveness and violence against women. The following is the transcript of an interview conducted by writer and radio host Meghan Murphy. A shortened version of the interview aired Feb. 27, 2012 on Vancouver Co-op Radio. This transcript is of the full interview. Further thoughts to add to this discussion: I have not written or spoken much about the...
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Partying and playing at Piggy’s Palace: Men’s silence about men’s violence

Jacqueline Guillion is a collective member at Vancouver Rape Relief and Women’s Shelter. This article was originally written for and published in Sister Outsiders, issue #4: What you won’t hear inside the Missing Women Commission of Inquiry.   Mainstream media like CBC, The Tyee, Vancouver Sun, and Seattle’s weekly, The Stranger, easily uncovered the fact that former Port Coquitlam Mayor, Scott Young, and hundreds of other people had attended events at Piggy’s Palace, the party venue operating for several years at Pickton’s pig farm. I asked some of those Vancouver rock/punk bands playing in the 1990s what they’d heard about Piggy’s Palace. I was relieved to hear my friends say they had refused to play there because, as one said “even though we’d played some shitty places, we’d heard...
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On Pornography and the Persistence of Patriarchy

Michael Laxer is a Canadian bookstore owner, a political activist and one of two spokespersons for the Socialist Party of Ontario. This post was originally published on Michael Laxer’s blog and was reprinted with permission from the author.   There is a debate that exists among leftists and feminists as to pornography. This, as a result of the imagery and social implications of the Internet, is an increasingly important debate As a man, I cannot speak to the differences that exist within the feminist movement regarding pornography. It is not, by definition, my place. But I can speak to the perceptions or misperceptions of pornography that seemingly exist within the broader left and among men. I can also speak to the fact that, as uncomfortable as it may make...
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Miss Representation: A critical review

Amidst a sea of accolades and five-star reviews (examples: here, here and here), Natalie Hill offers a dissenting opinion on Jennifer Siebel Newsom’s new film on the representation of women in the media.     You might say the representation of women in the media is somewhat of an obsession of mine.  Whether at journalism school or studying at the graduate level, research on stereotypical media narratives about women has always been my focus.  I was also recently lured into the core organizing team of the Vancouver chapter of WAM! (Women, Action and the Media), an organization designed to bring journalists, academics and activists together in progressive dialogue about the media.  For all of these reasons I was thrilled when I heard about a new documentary that explores the...
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Erotic capital: new language for old-school sexist views of women, work and success

Natalie Hill is an MA student in the Centre for Women’s and Gender Studies. She graduated from the School of Journalism at Carleton University, is a core organizing member of WAM! Vancouver (Women, Action and the Media).  When it comes to advancing in the work place, one might argue that never before have (some) women had so many resources to help get them to the top: university degrees and higher education, mentors and career counseling programs, even the ability to delay pregnancy while their careers are in their formative years. But stupidly, these women often overlook one of their best resources: their erotic capital. That is according to Catherine Hakim, a sociologist at the London School of Economics.  Her recently published book argues that taking advantage of one’s “erotic...
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The Myths of Bedford v. Canada: Why decriminalizing prostitution won’t help

This is a guest post by Laura Johnston, re-printed with the permission of the author and originally published at The F Word.  Laura is a law student who worked for Janine Benedet, counsel for the Women’s Coalition for the Abolition of Prostitution, an intervener in Bedford v. Canada case heard in the Ontario Court of Appeal in June 2011. I recently worked as a research assistant for counsel for one of the interveners in the Bedford v. Canada appeal. Bedford v. Canada challenges three Criminal Code provisions that criminalize parts of the prostitution industry as unconstitutional. In short, the provisions are communicating in a public place for the purpose of prostitution (which essentially criminalizes street prostitution), bawdy house (which criminalizes brothels) and living on the avails of prostitution (which...
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