Femininity is no joke: On the #nomakeupselfie and #‎manupandmakeup‬

Perhaps you’ve come across the #nomakeupselfie in your internet travels as of late — the campaign, which Cancer Research UK latched onto after seeing women posting photos of themselves on social media sites, makeup-free, with the hashtag #nomakeupselfie, began with the intention of somehow “raising awareness” about cancer.* Sali Hughes writes for The Guardian: About 48 hours ago, a number of self-portraits appeared on my Facebook feed. Each was of a woman ostensibly wearing no makeup, with the hashtag #beatcancer (not breast cancer, not ovarian or prostate or bone or lymph – just “cancer”). Nothing else. Simply a selfie, a slogan and a call to arms, imploring other women to do the same. I was perplexed as to how a seemingly incongruous gesture could influence the fight against cancer...
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Pinkwashing & the trouble with Breast Cancer Awareness campaigns: An interview with Kim Irish of Breast Cancer Action

October was breast cancer awareness month, a month when everything turns pink. But do these ‘pink’ campaigns actually work? In terms of ending the breast cancer epidemic is awareness productive? What does all this pinkwashing actually work towards? Will buying ‘pink’ products contribute towards prevention or towards finding a cure? I interviewed Kim Irish of Breast Cancer Action, back in November 2010. This interview originally aired on Vancouver Co-op Radio CFRO 102.7fm For more information on Breast Cancer Action or on the Think Before You Pink campaign, go to www.bcaction.org and www.thinkbeforeyoupink.org   Podcast: Play in new window | Download...
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The end is nigh. And the proof lies in Breast Cancer ‘Awareness’ Campaigns

Well this is it. The end is upon us. By now you’re probably near-bald from tearing your hair out over the effed-upedness that we are subjected to every time Breast Cancer Awareness Month rolls around. Suddenly we’re inundated with pink crap as every company around tries to glom on to the breast cancer epidemic in an offensively opportunistic fashion. From makeup, to laptops, to Swiffers (clean for the cure!), to ugly-ass jewelery, to one million stupid pink candles, it’s fair to say that pinkwashing has gotten totally out of control. And as if the feminizing pinking of absolutely everything (because breast cancer is so soft and delicate and lady-like) and the concerted efforts to make breast cancer all about consumerism directed very specifically at women (because effecting change can...
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Porny pubic hair seeks to end cancer once and for all!

This is just the worst. Along the lines of campaigns (if they could even be called campaigns, seem more like marketing schemes) like Boobies Rule and I Love Boobies, which promote the idea that we should only care about breast cancer because breasts are sexualized body parts, a campaign to ‘raise awareness’ about cervical cancer has popped up. This is the nonsensical PSA Julyna, who claims to “help promote education, healthy lifestyle choices and raise money for the Canadian Cancer Society” came up with: The idea behind this campaign is that styling our pubic hair will somehow ‘spread awareness’ about cervical cancer (again with the ambiguous ‘awareness‘ campaign wherein we ignore that which causes cancer in the first place, and simply promote ‘awareness’ about the cancer that already exists)....
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People who run breast cancer "awareness" campaigns appear to be morons

In case the title was unclear, this post will be brief and ragey. There are a myriad of reasons why “awareness” campaigns are flawed. But it is breast cancer “awareness” campaigns that seem to have perfected the act of combining flawed with offensive. It isn’t only that these campaigns have “lost focus” or that many of the companies who claim to support these campaigns, in fact, include carcinogens in their products (though these facts certainly are significant), but that many of the campaigns which claim to be “raising awareness” about breast cancer and, one would assume, therefore (supposedly) aiming to help women, do just the opposite. Check out this video, for example, created by a group called, obviously, “Boobies rule”     The corresponding site, which also sells t-shirts...
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